Tuesday, August 16, 2016

The Trinity isn't a job description

If a church/pastor regularly prays (or God forbid, baptizes) in the name of the Creator, Redeemer and Sustainer instead of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I hope she/he knows how disrespectful it is to call God with whom you claim to have a personal, loving relationship, by a job description. It's utilitarian and objectifies God. To my ears it sounds worse than a TV or radio preacher's health and wealth gospel. It's also a violation of 2000 years of Christian history and culture cutting us off from our past.

Imagine if I were walking with you down the streets of Lakeside, a very friendly community, and we meet someone you know and I don't. And you said, "I'd like you to meet retired librarian, cottage owner, who also donates to my church." This revised Trinitarian formula, now no longer trendy but entrenched in liberal mainline churches, is supposed to be 'inclusive." It came about from the feminist movement of the 70s which is at its core unChristian and Marxist, but has infected the Christian churches like black mold.

It's not that we don't ever describe the wonderful things God does for us--in fact, words fail when we try. They are so fabulous we have a book of stories, parables, miracles, poetry and laws to refer to. This is change that never made sense, and I don't know who started it, but probably the offering plate is the only way to stop it.

"Baptisms performed in the name of a gender-neutral Trinity are not true baptisms, the Catholic Church's highest doctrinal authority decreed on Friday (Feb. 29, 2008) Christianity Today." Most protestants don't know our baptisms, sprinkled, splashed, dunked or poured, are valid in the Catholic church--unless this formula is used because it's meaningless.

2 comments:

Paula said...

When I went to temple it never bothered me to see/hear God referred to as masculine, and it was awkward when they began changing everything. It pulls me out of the moment and I want to start redlining.

Dan Nieman said...

Very well said.